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ReliefWeb - Updates on Sierra Leone

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    0 0

    Source: BBC Media Action
    Country: Sierra Leone

    Summary

    BBC Media Action’s ‘Pathways to Learning’ project in the Eastern region of Sierra Leone aimed to improve farmers’ skills and knowledge about cocoa farming. Evaluation work in 2015 shows how farmers and local experts feel the project has helped to develop these.

    The project

    Between 2011 and 2015, BBC Media Action was funded by the European Union (EU), the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) and Interchurch Organisation for Development Cooperation (ICCO) to run the ‘Pathways for Learning’ project in Kenema, Kono and Kailahun – the three districts of the Eastern region of Sierra Leone. The project was run in partnership with Eastern Radio and Njala University, and included the production and broadcast of a package of radio programmes about the cocoa sector for farmers and potential farmers; a distance learning programme which took accredited learning directly to farmers through Farmer Field Schools; and intensive in-station training for local radio station partners – most notably Eastern Radio.


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    Source: Reuters - AlertNet
    Country: Afghanistan, Chad, Ethiopia, Haiti, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, World

    Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation - Fri, 23 Oct 2015 09:05 GMT

    Author: Rachel Stern

    BERLIN, Oct. 23 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Barren barley and wheat fields stretch across the dry landscape of northern Afghanistan, the result of persistent drought and flash flooding that has left thousands of people facing food shortages and loss of work.

    Read more on AlertNet.


    0 0

    Source: UN Children's Fund
    Country: Bangladesh, Benin, Cameroon, Chad, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Togo

    Alerte en RDC: Propagation vers l’Ouest à partir de Kindu le long du fleuve Congo*

    Les flambées des cas de choléra qui ont débuté à la semaine 35 dans la province de Maniema en RDC ne faiblissent pas.

    Cette province a rapporté plus de 3000 cas en 6 semaines avec 82 décès. Actuellement 9 districts situés le long du Fleuve Congo sont affectés dont 3 districts (Kindu, Kailo. Alunguli) plus sévèrement touchées et rapportent environ 95% des cas.

    La transmission se fait le long du fleuve à travers les voyageurs des bateaux, baleinières, pirogues motorisées à l’intérieur de la province du Maniema et en destination de la Province Orientale où plus de 1.000 cas sont enregistrés depuis la semaine 35 (debut de l’épidémie dans la province de Maniema ).

    Plusieurs partenaires (MSF, UNICEF, OMS, Caritas, Save the Children, Tear Fund, Solidarités International) ainsi que le réseau des radios locales ne ménagent aucun effort pour soutenir les autorités locales dans la réponse à cette épidémie.

    Alert in DRC: westward spread from Kindu along the Congo River

    The cholera outbreak that started at week 35 in the Maniema province in DRC does not falter. This province has reported more than 3,000 cases in 6 weeks including 82 deaths. Currently, 9 districts along the Congo River are affected among which 3 most severely (Kindu, Kailo and Alunguli). Those 3 districts account for about 95% of cases.
    Transmission occurs along the Congo river through travelers on boats, whaling boats, motorized canoes inside Maniema province and those travelling to the Province Orientale that recorded more than 1,000 cholera cases since week 35 (onset of the epidemic in the Maniema Province).

    Several partners (MSF, UNICEF, WHO, Caritas, Save the Children, Tear Fund, Solidarités International) as well as the network of local radio stations are working hard to support local authorities in response to this epidemic.


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    Source: Famine Early Warning System Network
    Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Djibouti, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tajikistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

    PROJECTED FOOD ASSISTANCE NEEDS FOR APRIL 2016

    This brief summarizes FEWS NET’s most forward-looking analysis of projected emergency food assistance needs in FEWS NET coverage countries. The projected size of each country’s acutely food insecure population (IPC Phase 3 and higher) is compared to last year and the recent five-year average and categorized as Higher ( S), Similar ( X), or Lower ( T). Countries where external emergency food assistance needs are anticipated are identified. Projected lean season months highlighted in red indicate either an early start or an extension to the typical lean season.
    Additional information is provided for countries with large food insecure populations, an expectation of high severity, or where other key issues warrant additional discussion. Analytical confidence is lower in remote monitoring countries, denoted by “RM”. Visit www.fews.net for detailed country reports


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    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Sierra Leone

    Sierra Leone’s Ebola outbreak, which disrupted agricultural and market activities, still threatens to erode food security and negatively affect the livelihoods of already vulnerable people, unless more is done to meet their immediate food and nutritional needs. To this end, the Comprehensive Food Security and Vulnerability Analysis will be key in post-Ebola recovery by identifying how to address food insecurity in Sierra Leone.

    In collaboration with FAO, the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry & Food Security (MAFFS) and other partners, WFP is undertaking the largest survey of its kind in the history of Sierra Leone: over 30,000 households will be surveyed in all 167 chiefdoms of the country. Not only will the survey look at food security, but it will also include a comprehensive assessment of the impact of Ebola on the region.

    This collaborative analysis will allow the Government of Sierra Leone and relevant stakeholders to better design future development programmes to improve food security and nutrition in the country. The CFSVA provides a breadth of information on the political, socio-economic and agro-ecological context, food supplies, markets, livelihoods, coping strategies, nutrition, health, and education. The analysis helps identify the root causes of food insecurity and an in-depth profile of food insecure people. At the same time, the survey will provide market analysis: looking at how they function, the price trends in the country, and risks to stability, like natural disasters, economic shocks, and health crises, to assess their potential impact on the most vulnerable.

    The last survey of this kind was conducted in 2010, and provided a baseline to understand food insecurity in Sierra Leone. At that time, almost half (45 percent) of people were classified as food insecure during the lean season. But the survey helped to identify some of the root causes of these high levels of food insecurity, and provided recommendations for its reduction. The 2015 CFSVA will provide crucial updates to this information. Data collection and analysis at the chiefdom level, which is currently ongoing, will allow the government and other implementing partners to target assistance and focus resources on the most food insecure parts of the country.

    “The comprehensive nature of the CFSVA will pave the way to reaching the most vulnerable people in the country. This survey is a key tool for designing targeted and evidence based programmes that will build a more resilient and food secure Sierra Leone in the future post-Ebola period,” says Peter Scott-Bowden, WFP’s Country Director & Representative.

    Partnerships are key to the survey’s success. Throughout the entire process, the skills of various agencies have been included to create a survey that looks at food security from all angles.

    “By approaching a food security assessment through such a collaborative and coordinated way, this study will gain from the extensive and varied experiences of many different individuals and stakeholders, thus increasing the reliability and likelihood of greater acceptability of the results by the government, donor community, United Nations agencies, NGOs and local communities,” explains FAO’s Representative, Gabriel Rugalema.

    Through the CFSVA, WFP and FAO are working with government experts to generate reliable and quality data that will be central to the successful implementation of major programmes that includes the Agenda for Prosperity, the ICADEP, and the Ebola recovery plan.


    0 0

    Source: Government of Sierra Leone
    Country: Sierra Leone

    • NEW CASES

    • New Confirmed cases = 0 as follows:

    Kailahun = 0, Kenema = 0, Kono = 0

    Bombali = 0, Kambia = 0, Koinadugu = 0, Port Loko =0, Tonkolili = 0

    Bo = 0, Bonthe = 0, Moyamba = 0 Pujehun = 0

    Western Area Urban = 0, Western Area Rural = 0, Missing = 0


    0 0

    Source: Government of Sierra Leone
    Country: Sierra Leone

    • NEW CASES

    • New Confirmed cases = 0 as follows:

    Kailahun = 0, Kenema = 0, Kono = 0

    Bombali = 0, Kambia = 0, Koinadugu = 0, Port Loko =0, Tonkolili = 0

    Bo = 0, Bonthe = 0, Moyamba = 0 Pujehun = 0

    Western Area Urban = 0, Western Area Rural = 0, Missing = 0


    0 0

    Source: Government of Sierra Leone
    Country: Sierra Leone

    • NEW CASES

    • New Confirmed cases = 0 as follows:

    Kailahun = 0, Kenema = 0, Kono = 0

    Bombali = 0, Kambia = 0, Koinadugu = 0, Port Loko =0, Tonkolili = 0

    Bo = 0, Bonthe = 0, Moyamba = 0 Pujehun = 0

    Western Area Urban = 0, Western Area Rural = 0, Missing = 0


    0 0

    Source: Government of Sierra Leone
    Country: Sierra Leone

    • NEW CASES

    • New Confirmed cases = 0 as follows:

    Kailahun = 0, Kenema = 0, Kono = 0

    Bombali = 0, Kambia = 0, Koinadugu = 0, Port Loko =0, Tonkolili = 0

    Bo = 0, Bonthe = 0, Moyamba = 0 Pujehun = 0

    Western Area Urban = 0, Western Area Rural = 0, Missing = 0


    0 0

    Source: Assessment Capacities Project
    Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, World, Yemen

    Snapshot 21-27 October 2015

    Afghanistan and Pakistan: A 7.5 magnitude earthquake struck on 26 October, with its epicentre in Jurm, in Afghanistan’s Badakhshan province. At least 82 people are reported dead in Afghanistan, with 300 wounded, and around 4,000 houses damaged in Badakhshan, Baghlan, Kunduz, Nangarhar, Parwan, and Takhar provinces. Landslides have impacted infrastructure and hindered access. Electricity and telecommunication have been severely affected, with remote rural areas reportedly cut off. In Pakistan 230 people have died, 1,629 are reported injured, and 2,536 houses damaged in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab, FATA, Gilgit-Baltistan, and Azad Jammu and Kashmir. In India, four people have been reported dead and several buildings damaged.

    South Sudan: 30,000 people are estimated to be experiencing Catastrophe (IPC Phase 5) food security outcomes in Unity state’s Leer, Guit, Koch and Mayendit counties. The people who fled to the bush during the intensification of violence between April and June are most affected. 3.9 million people are estimated to be experiencing Crisis (IPC Phase 3), Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and Catastrophe food security outcomes across South Sudan. This is likely to aggravate high needs for health and nutritional support.

    Updated: 27/10/2015. Next update: 03/11/2015.

    Global Emergency Overview Web Interface


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    Source: Guardian
    Country: Sierra Leone

    The young people left in charge of children in Sierra Leone are struggling to provide food for their siblings let alone pay for their schooling or find a job

    Going without food for two or three days is “like being in hell”, says Dauda Fullah, 25, who has been left to look after eight children and young adults since his parents died of Ebola.

    “It’s been tough. It’s not easy with me because of financial problems, solving all the problems of the family and at the same time hoping to go back to college,” Fullah says. “I have been looking for a job in health for two years now. Even if you are qualified, it is hard to get a job, it’s not easy.”

    Read the full article


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    Source: World Food Programme, Logistics Cluster
    Country: Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone


    0 0

    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo

    HIGHLIGHTS

    • The West Africa 2015 growing season developed under an evolving El Nino event that will peak in late 2015. This region tends to have seasonal rainfall deficits in the more marginal areas during El Nino seasons.

    • Accordingly, the first stages of the season (until mid July) were marked by pronounced rainfall deficits leading to delays in the start of the growing season and poor conditions for early crop development. This affected a wide region extending from Senegal, across Burkina and northern Nigeria, to Chad and eastern Niger.

    • However, from mid July onwards, Atlantic sea surface temperatures became warmer than average off the West African coast and colder than average in the Gulf of Guinea. This enhanced rainfall in the Sahel; as a result, persistent wetter than average conditions from late July to September wiped out seasonal rainfall deficits and led to a full recovery in crop and pasture conditions. Near average crop production is now the expected seasonal outcome, though concerns remain in marginal areas of Chad and eastern Niger.

    • These beneficial outcomes for the Sahel were however countered by much drier than average conditions along the Gulf of Guinea coast, from Liberia to southern Nigeria with Ghana particularly affected. This has hit the second cropping cycle in bimodal areas – seasonal rainfall forecasts for the next 3 months are pessimistic for this region and crop production is likely to be hit.


    0 0

    Source: Government of Sierra Leone
    Country: Sierra Leone

     NEW CASES

    • New Confirmed cases = 0 as follows:
      Kailahun = 0, Kenema = 0, Kono = 0 Bombali = 0, Kambia = 0, Koinadugu = 0, Port Loko =0, Tonkolili = 0 Bo = 0, Bonthe = 0, Moyamba = 0 Pujehun = 0 Western Area Urban = 0, Western Area Rural = 0, Missing = 0

     DISCHARGED CASES = 4,051

     CUMULATIVE CASES = 8,704

     CUMULATIVE DEATHS =3,589

    • Suspected cases = 5,071

    0 0

    Source: Action Against Hunger
    Country: Sierra Leone

    As the country gradually moves toward the end of the fight against Ebola, Freetown, the capital of Sierra Leone, has been hit again by another disaster. In mid-September massive floods caused by torrential rains hit Freetown and caused serious damage particularly to people living within the slum areas.

    The floods have left at least four people dead and more than 3,000 displaced in Freetown. The displaced people were relocated to the Siaka Stevens Stadium (in the west) and the Brima Artuga Mini Stadium (in the east).

    As the government and its partners focus on flood response geared towards providing shelter, food, clothing, and medication for victims, stringent efforts are being made to intensify surveillance and Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) measures to avoid the occurrence of Ebola and/or cholera, not only at the stadiums but also at the community level.

    A number of water points and sanitation facilities were damaged as a result of contamination due to the flooding. Action Against Hunger, as part of the Freetown WASH (Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene) Consortium, is responding to the emergency in three of the affected city sections by distributing hygiene kits, promoting hygiene practices, and working on water supply, particularly on bucket chlorination and emergency water kiosks in those communities where the water points have been contaminated.

    This flood has exposed the poor preparedness and response system in the country at both national and local levels. However, the Office of National Security (ONS), with strong backing from the office of the President, has taken a nationwide lead in coordinating with ministries and agencies to address issues around the flood, i.e. a cholera outbreak, and preventing subsequent ones. Action Against Hunger will continue to work with our partners to address these issues.


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    Source: International Crisis Group
    Country: Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    At the Ebola epidemic’s height in mid-2014, there were concerns social order in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone could collapse. International mobilisation, notably after the UN Security Council declared the epidemic “a threat to peace and security” on 18 September, brought an extensive intervention and considerable progress. When explaining the dramatic increase in infections starting in March, observers mostly point to weak health systems, limited resources, population mobility, inadequate support and that the virus was largely unknown in the region, but lack of trust in the state, its institutions and leaders was also a major factor. Nor was the international community beyond reproach. It prevaricated, and mostly ignored early and clear warnings until the threat was perceived as global. Unless lessons are learned across all these issues, the next regional health crisis will be as needlessly costly and disruptive as the Ebola epidemic and pose a similar risk to international stability.

    The virus initially spread unchecked not only because of the weakness of epidemiological monitoring and inadequate health system capacity and response, but also because people were sceptical of what their governments were saying or asking them to do. Lack of trust in government intentions, whether in the form of political opportunism or corruption, was based on experience. In its initial phase, many West Africans thought Ebola was a ploy to generate more aid funding or reinforce the position of ruling elites. And when Ebola proved real enough, political machinations and manip­u­lation needlessly hindered the early response.

    Initially information was not shared, and warnings were not disseminated widely enough. Countries hesitated to declare an emergency for fear of creating panic and scaring away business. Once they did so, their governments relied on the security services – their most capable, internationally supported institutions – but the early curfews and quarantines exacerbated tensions and alienated people whose cooperation was necessary to contain the epidemic. Officials in capitals also initially ignored local authorities, who were sometimes more familiar with traditional customs and accepted by their communities (with the exception of Guinée Forestière, where local authorities were no more familiar with local customs or trusted than the national government).

    Despite huge investments in peacekeeping and state building in Liberia and Sierra Leone in the preceding decade and a significant UN and non-governmental organisation (NGO) presence, the region was ill prepared for a health crisis of such magnitude. Broader issues of national reconstruction, particularly in those two countries, combined with the prioritising of specific diseases, such as HIV/AIDS and malaria, contributed to produce stove-piped health sectors with abundant resources for those targeted diseases but resource-strapped health ministries overall that were particularly vulnerable to a health emergency. Aid organisations, with far better resources than the local ministries, also inadvertently undercut attempts at self-sufficiency.

    It was only after the second wave of Ebola cases threatened the very stability of the affected countries that authorities took concerted action (with the help of NGOs, international agencies on the ground and donors), starting with the engagement of community leaders. Particularly in Liberia, they slowly learned what did not work and how to better communicate appropriate precautions and necessary cultural changes, eg, handling of deceased relatives, that finally helped bring the epidemic under control.

    The international reaction was equally problematic and rightly criticised as dysfunctional and inadequate by many observers. Early warnings were largely ignored until cases began cropping up in the U.S. The World Health Organization (WHO), which had stalled for far too long on declaring an international health emergency, then proved incapable of mounting an effective response. The Security Council was forced to create a new body to scale up and coordinate operations – with variable results – the UN Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER).

    Lastly, the intervention may have exacerbated some risks in countries whose dysfunctional political systems not only hindered the response, but also posed serious constraints to a recovery. The arsenal of additional public health measures for use in an emergency, such as bans on public gatherings, that ruling elites acquired has potential to be misused for political gain. Although a return to open conflict in Ebola-affected countries is unlikely, a number of issues could provoke further unrest in them, from restrictions on opposition movements to simple further estrangement of civil society. This bodes poorly not only for democracy, but also for the region’s response to the next health emergency.

    Divorcing political consideration from the response to public health crises should be a priority. It requires transparency from governments, opposition groups and international organisations. As a first step, West Africa’s still fragile states need to learn from and allay fears over actions taken against Ebola, as well as account for the use of Ebola-related resources. The movement toward greater regional cooperation, with regards to both transmissible disease and other transnational threats, is at least one positive development emerging from the crisis. Sustained international support is likewise necessary in the recovery process. Donors and implementers must also learn from their own failings during the Ebola response. The epidemic might not have been preventable; it certainly was controllable in the early stages. Avoiding a repetition requires addressing the errors of the past.

    RECOMMENDATIONS

    To definitively end the Ebola epidemic and limit the impact of the next health crisis

    To the governments of Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea:

    1. Make accountability an important component of the post-Ebola recovery strategy by increasing transparency in Ebola funding in all three countries and taking action over missing funds.

    2. Build on civil society initiatives that bridge socio-political cleavages and help create a more collaborative approach to crisis response.

    3. Strengthen health systems (especially for treatment of other diseases), including by investing in early warning, epidemiological capacities and adequate clinics and staff for the population.

    4. Make clear distinctions between public health imperatives and actions that can be construed as giving political advantage to a particular region or party.

    5. Encourage greater cross-border cooperation and information sharing on health crises and other transnational threats.
      To the Economic Community of West Africa (ECOWAS):

    6. Strengthen regional health surveillance, communication and coordination mechanisms.

    7. Draw lessons from the Nigerian experience and establish or reinforce rapid-reaction teams to investigate and respond to possible epidemics.

    To donors and the UN Security Council:

    1. Pay close attention to the governance challenges that have undermined citizens’ trust in their governments and institutions.

    2. Support accountability and transparency regarding Ebola-designated funds, including audits by the governments of the three affected states.

    3. Remain consistently engaged in the post-epidemic recovery process, including by delivering on pledges committed at the International Ebola Recovery Conference (9 and 19 July 2015).

    4. Rebuild health structures and address diseases neglected during the Ebola epidemic by sustaining support long after media and political attention has shifted.

    5. Ensure necessary support for the planned African Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. Conduct an independent review of the UN response (notably that of the UN Mission for Ebola Emergency Response, UNMEER) to determine what lessons can be learned for future regional operations.
      To the World Health Organization (WHO) Executive Board, Health Assembly and UN General Assembly:

    6. Ensure that the WHO reform process creates an emergency unit with the capacity and ability to effectively coordinate the response to public health crises, with special attention to developing countries.

    7. Insist on an independent review of the ongoing WHO reform process and hold officials at the country, regional and headquarters level accountable for fully implementing reforms.

    8. Cooperate with wider humanitarian and health systems in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

    Dakar/Brussels, 28 October 2015


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    Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    Country: Angola, Benin, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Togo, Uganda

    • Mostly near-average conditions have been observed across West Africa during this past week.
    • Heavy rain continues for portions of southern Ethiopia and Somalia, raising flooding concerns in East Africa.

    1) Poorly distributed rainfall has resulted in drought, which has severely impacted ground conditions and already led to livestock death across parts of north-central and eastern Ethiopia.

    2) Below-average rainfall since August has led to a strengthening of moisture deficits throughout several provinces in southern South Sudan and northern Uganda. Dry conditions now stretch into Lake Victoria regions of western Kenya.

    3) Persistent Below-average rainfall since August over several bimodal areas of Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Togo, Benin, and Nigeria has led to a strengthening of moisture deficits and a degradation of ground conditions resulting in drought.

    4) Heavy rains over the last 2 weeks have led to swelling rivers in Somalia and Southern Ethiopia. The Shabelle River, and more nominally, the Jubba River are forecasted to be near or above flood stage. Flood risk is high for the middle and lower reaches of the Shabelle and moderate for the lower portions of the Jubba River. Additional forecasted rain threatens to exasperate the situation, continuing the threat for river and flash flooding.

    5) Erratic and poorly distributed rainfall over the past month has led to moisture deficits to begin the season in the Sugar cane growing region of South Africa. Vegetation indices reveal already degrading conditions on the ground.


    0 0

    Source: World Health Organization
    Country: Guinea, Italy, Liberia, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Spain, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America

    SUMMARY

    • Three new confirmed cases of Ebola virus disease (EVD) were reported in the week to 25 October, all of which were reported in Guinea. The country also reported 3 cases the previous week. All 3 new cases are from the same household in the subprefecture of Kaliah, Forecariah, and are registered high-risk contacts linked to a case from the same area last week. There are currently 364 contacts under follow-up in Guinea (an increase from 246 the previous week), 141 of whom are high-risk. An additional 233 contacts identified during the past 42 days remain untraced. Therefore there remains a near-term risk of further cases among both registered and untraced contacts. Sierra Leone reported zero cases for a sixth consecutive week, and will be declared free of EVD transmission on 7 November if no further cases are reported.

    • Case incidence has remained at 5 confirmed cases or fewer per week for 13 consecutive weeks. Over the same period, transmission of the virus has been geographically confined to several small areas in western Guinea and Sierra Leone, marking a transition to a distinct, third phase of the epidemic. The phase-3 response1 coordinated by the Interagency Collaboration on Ebola2 builds on existing measures to drive case incidence to zero, and ensure a sustained end to EVD transmission. Enhanced capacity to rapidly identify a reintroduction (either from an area of active transmission or from an animal reservoir), or re-emergence of virus from a survivor, and capacity for testing and counselling as part of a comprehensive package to safeguard the welfare of survivors are central to the phase-3 response framework.

    • The 3 new confirmed cases reported in the week to 25 October are members of the same family and household in the village of Kondeyah, in the subprefecture of Kaliah, Forecariah. The cases are a 25-year-old woman who is 7-months pregnant, and her 10-year-old son and 4-year-old daughter. All are currently receiving treatment. They are the seventh, eighth, and ninth cases in the Forecariah branch of the Ratoma transmission chain. The branch was initiated after a 10-year-old girl who was not a registered contact travelled from Ratoma to Forecariah to seek treatment from several traditional healers who later became ill and were confirmed as EVD-positive. Of 364 contacts under follow-up in Guinea on 25 October, 43 were located in Conakry with 321 located in Forecariah. The 3 new cases have generated 55 high-risk contacts in Kondeyah.

    • In Sierra Leone, all contacts linked to the country’s 2 most recently active chains of transmission, Bombali and Kambia, have completed 21-day follow-up. The last case to receive treatment was confirmed free of EVD after a second consecutive negative test on 25 September. The country will be declared free of EVD transmission on 7 November if no further cases are reported.

    • Robust surveillance measures are essential to ensure the rapid detection of any reintroduction or reemergence of EVD in currently unaffected areas. Nine operational laboratories in Guinea tested a total of 644 new and repeat samples in the week to 25 October. In Liberia, 1038 new and repeat samples were tested over the same period in the country’s 4 operational laboratories. 1389 new samples were collected in Sierra Leone (the fourth consecutive weekly decrease) and tested by 9 operational laboratories.


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    Source: AmeriCares
    Country: Liberia, Sierra Leone

    Two years ago, Kla Williams’s lost his job when his hometown of Monrovia, Liberia, was overwhelmed by Ebola. He followed his impulse to help his country and is now a skilled infection prevention and control worker – one of hundreds of West Africans AmeriCares has trained in the lifesaving skills that prevent infections from spreading in hospitals, clinics and homes. “We are ready for any kind of outbreak, but before we were not ready,” says Williams.

    Skilled health workers are critical to a full recovery. Before the Ebola crisis, families in Liberia and Sierra Leone had a difficult time accessing health services – rural clinics and urban hospitals were crowded and understaffed. The spread of Ebola made the situation more dire – not only did health workers die from the virus, but patients were reluctant to seek health services, as hospitals and clinics had sometimes unwittingly spread Ebola. As a result, people stayed away from health facilities: In Grand Bassa County, Liberia, people seeking care decreased by 20 percent; the number of pregnant women making clinic appointments dropped by 19 percent.

    AmeriCares is working in Liberia and Sierra Leone to strengthen the workforce and health facilities and rebuild trust. At two hospitals serving Freetown, the capital of Sierra Leone, AmeriCares is training more than 300 hospital staff and 500 nursing students in infection control, as well as supplying critical safety gear and upgrading facilities to build in safeguards against spread of infection.

    In Grand Bassa County in Liberia, AmeriCares is working with the Ministry of Health to ensure that health services for mothers and newborns are expanded and improved at two district hospitals. AmeriCares is giving health workers critical midwifery skills, to identify problems and help women in childbirth as well as providing medicine, medical supplies and equipment and building new, separate clinic space for safe birthing. One recently completed facility renovation now serves some 15,000 residents in and around Zondo Town in Grand Bassa with a modern maternal/child clinic.

    “These programs will improve health at the community level, strengthening health systems to be resilient day to day as well as in times of crisis,” says Elikem Tomety-Archer, AmeriCares senior director of Africa and Middle East partnerships. “Women are leaders, so by focusing on them, we will help rebuild trust in the health system as well.”


    0 0

    Source: Government of Sierra Leone
    Country: Sierra Leone

     NEW CASES

    • New Confirmed cases = 0 as follows:
      Kailahun = 0, Kenema = 0, Kono = 0 Bombali = 0, Kambia = 0, Koinadugu = 0, Port Loko =0, Tonkolili = 0 Bo = 0, Bonthe = 0, Moyamba = 0 Pujehun = 0 Western Area Urban = 0, Western Area Rural = 0, Missing = 0

     DISCHARGED CASES = 4,051

     CUMULATIVE CASES = 8,704

     CUMULATIVE DEATHS =3,589

    • Suspected cases = 5,071

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